Area Lakes

Area-Lakes-Intro

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last update: 21 May  2017

Introduction

The 3 main lakes in the area somewhat comparable to Chandos Lake are Jack Lake, Paudash Lake (combining Upper and Lower Paudash), and Anstruther Lake.  Wollaston Lake is close by, but somewhat smaller.   The Kawartha Lakes that are part of the Trent-Severn Waterway are further south.  There is also a set of relatively uninhabited smaller lakes in the Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park.

Anstruther and Jack are part of the Nogies, Mississagua, Eels and Jack watersheds. These waters eventually make their way to the Trent-Severn Waterway.  The lakes draining into the Trent-Severn Waterway are mostly dammed “reservoir” lakes.  Their levels are controlled to maintain a 6′ navigation draft on the Canal and through the locks.

For a very illuminating look at the challenges related to maintaining lake levels, see the Scugog Stewards Report

Chandos, Paudash , and Wollaston are part of the Crowe River Watershed.  watersheds (also Crowe River Wollaston Deer River)

Eventually the waters from these smaller watersheds enter the Trent River on their way to Lake Ontario, and thus are all part of the Trent River watershed, and ultimately, the Lake Ontario Watershed.  see: Lake Ontario Watershed

See the section on Zebra Mussels under the geology tab for lake specific information on zebras in the area..

Jack-Lake

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Jack Lake

Jack Lake is just south of Chandos Lake and east of Apsley. It is a good size and deep lake, with many islands, embayments, and an irregular shoreline. It is within the Peterborough Crown Game Preserve, and  a considerable portion of its shoreline is crown land.  It is part of the Trent-Severn system and drains into Stony Lake.  As such, it is a water reservoir for the Trent Canal system, and its level is controlled by a dam  which can vary the level by as much as 5 feet, based on the dam min/max, but as seen in the graph below, the yearly variation is more like 2.5 feet. Parks Canada water levels

Jack Lake water levels.JPG

Jack Lake spans 2 different townships, and has a natural environment that transitions from Southern Ontario to the Canadian Shield, providing a highly varied flora/fauna/geology.

Jack Lake Sustainability and Stewardship Plan Background

Jack Lake history and geology

Paudash-Lake

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Paudash Lake

Paudash Lake is a shield lake just south of Bancroft.  Whereas both Chandos and Jack Lakes have significant calcium levels, Paudash exhibits much lower calcium levels, typical of the more northern shield lakes and the Muskoka Lakes.  It is part of the Crowe River watershed, and is where the Crowe River originates.  There is a small dam at the exit to the Crowe River, the purpose of which is to maintain the water level.  There have been issues with cobalt and  uranium contamination due to mining and tailing ponds associated with the Faraday and Dyno mines. (Paudash Lake)

march2005final_paudashplan

Anstruther-Lake

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Anstruther Lake

Anstruther is just west of Apsley and is in the Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park.  Much of the shoreline is Crown Land, with many of the cottages being water access only. It is part of the Trent-Severn watershed, and eventually drains into the Mississagua River, and thence into Lower Buckhorn Lake, and from there into the Trent-Severn Waterway.

There are dams at the outlets of both Anstruther and the downstream Mississagua Lake that control the water level on Anstruther.  Thus these lakes are reservoir lakes for the Trent-Severn Waterway.

The water levels on Anstruther can vary significantly. anstruther waterlevels

anstruther-lake-water-levels

Wollaston-Lake

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Wollaston Lake

Wollaston Lake is a medium sized lake near Coe Hill  in reasonable proximity to Chandos Lake.  The Crowe River Conservation Authority operates a dam where the lake drains into the Deer River, to control water levels.
There is an interesting Geology report on Wollaston Township by D. F. Hewitt in the last half of the paper  geology-of-chandos-twp-r011.

See Also   wollaston-lake-env-scorecard-2015-final

TSW-Kawartha-Lakes

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Trent-Severn Kawartha Lakes

Although there are Kawartha Lakes not directly on the Trent-Severn Waterway, (eg Anstruther) there is a chain of lakes that form part of the waterway  eg Balsam, Cameron, Sturgeon, Pigeon, Buckhorn, Chemong,  Lovesick, Stony, Clear, Katchewanooka, Rice.  Their interconnectedness, as well the boat traffic, present unique issues in which upstream lakes affect downstream ones.  These lakes also have dams, locks, towns, and waste water treatment facilities to contend with.

 See Kawartha Lakes Stewards Report 2015  

Also see the 2016 report, which discusses their current paleo project: KLSA 2016

There are some historically interesting studies on the sediments of Sturgeon and Rice lakes from 1994.  See: Sturgeon and Rice lakes nutrient study 1994

KHPP-Lakes

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Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park Lakes

There are quite a few lakes in the KHPP.  In 2015, about 22 of the relatively uninhabited lakes were comprehensively and simultaneously assessed for water quality.  The study provides an excellent bench mark look at this group of relatively untouched lakes in the area.  Of particular interest is the data reporting on Bottom Water Chemistries. It might be instructive to perform some top and bottom core diatom determinations on a couple of these lakes to see how they have changed, given that they have never been seriously settled by cottagers..
No data is presented on Dissolved Oxygen levels.  It is apparent though that on average the lakes are anoxic in the hypolimnion in late summer.  The interesting thing here is that these lakes are similar to Gilmour Bay in this regard, even though they  not been subject to the cottager load that Gilmour Bay has.

khpp-data-report-2015_final