Introduction

Comparison of Chandos Lake with area lakes

Chandos is the only area lake which is over 1000 hectares in size with an average depth over 10m, although  Jack and Paudash are close behind.  Other area lakes are either overly small or overly shallow.

The ” * “ lakes data follow Adams and Taylor’s book  about the Kawarthas, as these are felt to be reasonably reliable. The various other sources all differ to a degree, and are likely secondary at best.    Also, keep in mind that the lake levels rise and fall a few feet throughout the year, so the above numbers are to be regarded as working and comparative approximations.

The 3 main lakes in the area somewhat comparable to Chandos Lake are Jack Lake, Paudash Lake (combining Upper and Lower Paudash), and Anstruther LakeWollaston Lake is close by, but somewhat smaller.   The Kawartha Lakes that are part of the Trent-Severn Waterway are further south.  There is also a set of relatively uninhabited smaller lakes in the Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park.

Anstruther and Jack are part of the Nogies, Mississagua, Eels and Jack watersheds. These waters eventually make their way to the Trent-Severn Waterway.  The lakes draining into the Trent-Severn Waterway are mostly dammed “reservoir” lakes.  Their levels are controlled to maintain a 6′ navigation draft on the Canal and through the locks.

For a very illuminating look at the challenges related to maintaining lake levels, see the Scugog Stewards Report

Chandos, Paudash , and Wollaston are part of the Crowe River Watershed.  

Eventually the waters from these smaller watersheds enter the Trent River on their way to Lake Ontario, and thus are all part of the Trent River watershed, and ultimately, the Lake Ontario Watershed. 

See the section on Zebra Mussels under the geology tab for lake specific information on zebras in the area..